Changing our wardrobe as we move from summer to autumn is something we all take for granted, but did you know it can be just as important to adjust your skincare routine as the seasons change?

The cooler weather and a drop-in humidity, combined with the addition of central heating, can result in a multitude of skin concerns in autumn, including eczema and dry, itchy skin.

Skincare in autumn needs to address these changing conditions, adapting the products we use and the routine we follow to boost skin nourishment and maintain its natural oils.

The importance of good skincare in autumn

Our skin is the body’s largest organ and keeping it healthy is an important part of maintaining overall health and wellbeing.

Skin plays a vital role in regulating body temperature and fluid balance, and acts as a barrier between your body and the outside world. It is your body’s first line of defence against pathogens and other harmful agents, is involved in the production of certain vitamins and, of course, is a major sensory organ too.

As this article explains, numerous infections can occur when the skin barrier is compromised.

Autumn and winter can be particularly problematic seasons for skin, as the dehydration caused by constantly switching between cold and warm air can make the outer skin layers more prone to damage.

A build-up of dead skin cells can also block pores, preventing the necessary excretion of oil, sweat and dirt that keeps the deeper layers of the dermis healthy. This can lead to breakouts and even drier skin.

So, what can we do to combat these problems? Read on for our autumn skincare tips...

 

Autumn skincare tips

Cleanse and moisturise: The cooler autumn weather can dry skin out, so one of the key switches to make is to swap light summer cleansers and moisturisers for richer formulas that will soothe and nourish.

We love this gentle cleansing melt from Evolve, which contains organic baobab oil to soothe and hydrate while nourishing the delicate barrier function that is so important for effective skincare in autumn.



Sknfed Organic Face Moisturiser is also perfect for daily use, with a luxuriant and dense yet non-greasy formula.




Exfoliate: The combination of autumn’s cooler, drier air interspersed with blasts of hot, dry air as we all switch our central heating back on, results in moisture being drawn out of skin cells, leaving our dehydrated skin feeling tight, dull, rough and flaky. This build-up of dead skin cells can also lead to blocked pores and breakouts.

The solution is regular exfoliation to remove the dead skin cells and unblock pores. UpCircle’s Coffee Face Scrub is a perfect choice, gently buffing away dry skin cells, while the natural anti-inflammatory properties of the high caffeine content works to brighten complexions. Shea butter provides a burst of post-scrub moisture.



Mask: The ideal time to feed your skin with a nourishing mask is immediately after exfoliating, when skin cells and pores will be more receptive.

We love a sheet mask, and this one from Orgaid is particularly good for deep-down nourishment, with a concentrated organic serum to boost skin and Greek yogurt to nourish and tighten.


Body oil or moisturiser: When the weather turns a little cooler and we start to swap our short sleeves for jumpers and shorts for trousers, it’s so easy to forget that it’s not just our faces that deserve good skincare. The skin on the rest of the body is just as prone to drying out in autumn. Our hands in particular go through a tough time in the cooler months. Make sure your autumn skincare regime extends to the rest of your body, with products like this delicious Argan, Almond & Cacao Body Butter from Rabot 1745.

 


With a little TLC, your autumn skin can be just as glowing and healthy as it is in summer. If you have any specific skincare concerns, Ethical Apothecary’s beauty experts can help. Send us a message on the web chat channel, giving as much detail as you can on your skincare problems, and one of our experienced therapists will get back to you with tailored, personalised advice.